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Sherbaz Hashmi, from the Australian National University, is the Australian recipient of the Esri Young Scholar Award for 2019. His project, Shout Out, aims to streamline and simplify the process for reporting public issues across Australia, such as graffiti, noise, air pollution, road damage, abandoned cars, roadkill and more.

Studying a Bachelor of Software Engineering and a Bachelor of Environment and Sustainability, Sherbaz has always had an interest in how technology can solve real world problems.

If you drive over a pothole, spot graffiti or notice an abandoned vehicle, how do you know who to call? It can be confusing for the general public to identify who is responsible for fixing community problems, not to mention the time involved in calling to report an issue.

Shout Out harnesses the power of GIS technology to streamline the otherwise problematic process of reporting public issues. Out of an outstanding lineup of Esri Young Scholar entries received this year, Sherbaz’s project was recognised for his client-centric approach, intuitive design and user interface – elements that combined to create a successful GIS application.

Esri Australia Young Scholar Recipient Sherbaz Hashmi

Shout Out leverages a combination of Esri technology. Survey123 for ArcGIS is used by the public to collect and send data, including the geolocation of the incident, which shows the relevant survey point on a map. Moderators can review each incident through a customised Esri Web App. Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS sorts and displays issues by level of urgency in each state or territory. The final stage utilises Workforce for ArcGIS to assign and monitor tasks.

Esri technology is used along each facet of the process. The entire process was streamlined due to the integration of Esri apps and maps.

When asked about winning the Esri Young Scholar award, Sherbaz said he is passionate about developing his GIS skills. As part of his prize, he will be jet setting off in July to the biggest GIS conference in the world – the Esri User Conference in San Diego.

“I have a once in a lifetime opportunity to go to the UC and shape the focus of my career. I want to focus on people – not just code,” said Sherbaz.

Sherbaz says the best part of winning the Young Scholar will be meeting Esri president Jack Dangermond. “I have been brainstorming what I want to say to Jack when I meet him. I am fascinated to meet him!”

Check back after the Esri User Conference to hear about Sherbaz’s time in San Diego. Want to know more about the Young Scholar Competition? Click here.

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